Posts Tagged ‘FLS’

Remembering Edwin Ephraim Riseley ZSL and Linnean Society

August 1, 2017

Riseley FLS plaque

Riseley’s plaque and photo from the Proceedings of the Linnean Society.

Remembering Edwin Ephraim Riseley, who died during the Battle of Passchendaele, 1st August 1917. Librarian at the Linnean Society and formerly at ZSL London Zoo Library.

His Latin plaque at the Linnean Society reads:

In memory of Edwin Ephraim Riseley
Born on the 15th February 1889,
in charge of this library from 1914 to 1917
during which period by universal consent
he endeared himself to the Fellows [of the Linnean Society]
by the energetic and able discharge of his duties;

he had laid down for his country a life of high promise
on the 1st August 1917 in the 29th year of his age.

Rifleman E. E.  Riseley S/21693, 3rd Battalion, Rifle Brigade was killed by a shell explosion aged 28 on 1st August 1917 at Passchendaele.

Riseley has no known grave but is named and remembered at the Linnean Society Library and  at the Librarians Memorial, British Library, both in London  along with among the thousands with no known grave remembered at the Menin Gate, Ypres.

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Librarians’ Memorial, British Library, London 1914-19 

https://worldwarzoogardener1939.wordpress.com/2017/04/21/remembering-zsl-london-zoo-librarian-henry-peavot-killed-ww1-21-april-1917/

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HGJ Peavot of London Zoo Library and his former assistant E.E. Riseley are remembered on the Librarians’ WW1 Memorial, Britain Library, London 

Read more of his story here:

https://worldwarzoogardener1939.wordpress.com/2017/07/30/lost-gardeners-and-zoo-staff-during-passchendaele-1917-ww1/

and more on the Roll of Honour of Fallen Fellows of the Linnean Society

https://worldwarzoogardener1939.wordpress.com/2013/09/11/lost-fellows-the-linnean-society-roll-of-honour-1914-1918/

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Edwin Riseley is remembered on the The Ypres Memorial (Menin Gate). Image: CWGC website

Edwin Riseley, remembered.

Blogposted by Mark Norris, 100 years on from Riseley’s death in 1st August 1917 / 2017 for the World War Zoo Gardens project.

Remembering the Somme Battle of Thiepval 1916

September 26, 2016

 

cwgc thiepval

Routledge is one of several British zoo staff with no known grave are remembered amongst thousands on the Thiepval Memorial on the Somme (Image: CWGC website)

Remembering today the thousands who died on each side of the Somme Battle of Thiepval  including 100 years ago today on 26 September 1916:

Wilfred Omer Cooper, writer and naturalist,  FLS Fellow of the Linnean Society, died Somme 26 September 2016

Alfred Routledge, Belle Vue Zoo Manchester staff, died 26 September 2016  September 1916

1. Wilfrid Omer Cooper
Born 1895, he was killed in 26 September 1916. He had been involved with the Bournemouth Natural Science Society, studying isopods.

Elected to the Linnean Society only in Spring 1915, Cooper  was still a private G/40113 in the 12 Battalion Regiment, Middlesex Regiment when he died aged 21. He has no known grave and is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial to the missing of the Somme battles.

He is listed on the CWGC website as the son of the late John Omer Cooper (died 1912) and Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Thompson Cooper, 6 Queensland Road, Boscombe, Bournemouth.

On the listing for Soldiers Died in The Great War (SDGW) he is listed as born at Boscombe, Bournemouth, Hants and resident at Bournemouth. He enlisted at High Beech, Loughton and was originally listed as formerly B/23290 Royal Fusiliers. He is the author of several papers and books including The Fishing Village and other writings (Literary and Scientific) posthumously published in Bournemouth by H.G.Commin 1917, the author one Wilfrid Omer-Cooper.

Read more about Cooper and the Linnean Society losses in WW1 here:

https://worldwarzoogardener1939.wordpress.com/2013/09/11/lost-fellows-the-linnean-society-roll-of-honour-1914-1918/

http://thebournemouthian.co.uk/2016/07/01/bournemouth-school-and-the-battle-of-the-somme/

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Taken from the ‘Bournemouth School and WW1’ website

 

 

2. Alfred Routledge, Belle Vue Zoo Manchester staff, died 26 September 2016

He died serving with the 11th Battalion Manchester Regiment on The Somme, aged 23 on 26 September 1916. He was killed in an attack on Mouquet Farm which was part of the final and successful British attempt to capture the village of Thiepval.

The village occupied high ground in the centre of the battlefield and had been a British objective on the first day of The Battle of The Somme on 1 July 1916.

Alfred Routledge is one of the many “Missing of the Somme”  listed on the Thiepval memorial, having no known grave. Routledge was  killed in the  final days of taking Thiepval village, one of the original objectives of the 1st July 1916, the first disastrous day of the Battle of The Somme two months earlier.

CWGC lists him as the son of the late Alfred and Emily Barton Routledge of 504 Gorton Lane, Gorton. Married. Routledge and fellow Belle Vue Zoo staff Sidney Turner and Ralph Stamp are remembered on the St. James Parish Church war memorial at:  http://gortonphilipsparkcemetrywargrave.weebly.com/st-james-church-gorton.html

Read more about Routledge and the Manchester men of Belle Vue Zoo in WW1:

https://worldwarzoogardener1939.wordpress.com/2015/11/07/remembering-the-lost-ww1-staff-of-belle-vue-zoo-manchester/

http://gortonphilipsparkcemetrywargrave.weebly.com/belle-vue-war-memorial.html

Late September  and early October 1916 was a bad few weeks for British zoo and botanic gardens staff. No doubt the zoo and gardens community was equally affected by the losses in Germany.

Kew Gardens staff

The follwing Kew Gardens men will also lose their lives in the closing months of the 141 days of the Somme fighting:

Sergeant Sydney George Cobbold, S/12906, 8th Battalion, Rifle Brigade died on the 3rd October 1916, aged 28. He has a known grave in a small Somme cemetery.

Sydney Cobbold (Kew Guild photo)

Sydney Cobbold of the 8th Battalion, Rifle Brigade died 3rd October 1916, Somme area (Kew Guild photo)

Rifleman John Divers, service number 7056, 1st / 9th Battalion, London Regiment (Queen Victoria Rifles) and also County of London Cyclists, died on 9th October 1916.

kew divers

June 2016: Kew staff commemorate  John Divers near where he was killed on the Somme  in 1916.  

 

Rifleman / Corporal Herbert Martin Woolley, “Essex Regiment”  is most likely to be Rifleman 3844, 1st / 5th Battalion, London Regiment (London Rifle Brigade), died 9 October 1916.

Herbert is commemorated on Panel Reference Pier and Face 9 D, Thiepval Memorial, along with fellow Kewite John Divers.

I will blog post 100 years on the anniversary of each of their deaths. In the meantime, read more about them at:

https://worldwarzoogardener1939.wordpress.com/2013/07/19/such-is-the-price-of-empire-the-lost-gardeners-of-kew-in-the-first-world-war/

London Zoo

ZSL London Zoo lost the following young keeping staff (‘Helpers’)  in the latter part of the Somme battles in September and October 1916.

15.9.1916        Arthur G. Whybrow      2547, 19 Bn. County of London Regt.  ZSL Helper.

05.10.1916      Gerald P Patterson       19th County of London Regt.     ZSL Helper

and an older Keeper whose grand-daughter I met whilst researching at London Zoo:

23.10.1916      William Dexter  Kings Royal Rifles, Rifleman    ZSL Keeper 

I will blog post 100 years on the anniversary of each of their deaths. In the meantime, read more about them at:

https://worldwarzoogardener1939.wordpress.com/2013/11/04/remembering-lost-wartime-staff-of-zsl-london-zoo-in-ww1/

A lucky wounded survivor  who went on to found an amazing zoo …

George Mottershead (of the BBC ‘Our Zoo’ fame) of the Manchester Regiment will be severely injured on the 15th October 1916, surviving a spinal wound that nearly killed him and left him paralysed for several years bfeore he struggled to walk again and create Chester Zoo in the 1930s. He would lose several brothers or family members in WW1.

Remember all these men and their families  100 years on.

Scheduled blogpost for 26 September 2016 by Mark Norris, Newquay Zoo / World War Zoo Gardens project.

Remembering Albert Dermott ZSL Somme 10 July 1916

July 10, 2016

 

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Autumn colours behind the ZSL war memorial, London Zoo, November 2010 (Photo: Kate Oliver, ZSL Education)

Remembering those killed on the Somme 10 July 1916 including:

Albert A. Dermott of London Zoo staff, ZSL Messenger 

https://worldwarzoogardener1939.wordpress.com/2013/11/04/remembering-lost-wartime-staff-of-zsl-london-zoo-in-ww1/

T. Percy Peed  nurseryman, S.Staffs Regiment

Geoffrey Watkins Smith, FLS

Printed in the Proceedings of The Linnean Society for 1918/9 is a short roll of honour listing eight fellows or employees who died in the First World War. Amongst them Geoffrey Watkins Smith, is described as “one of the most brilliant of the younger generation of Zoologists” (proceedings, 1916-17, page 64-65).https://worldwarzoogardener1939.wordpress.com/2013/09/

Remembered all at:

https://wordpress.com/post/worldwarzoogardener1939.wordpress.com/77631

The morphology of leaf fall: Remembering Ernest Lee FLS died Flanders, 11 July 1915

July 11, 2015

His grave lies in the rows to the right of the cross of sacrifice at Artillery Wood Cemetery, Ypres, Belgium. (Image www.cwgc.org)

Ernest Lee’s  grave lies in the rows to the right of the cross of sacrifice at Artillery Wood Cemetery, Ypres, Belgium. (Image http://www.cwgc.org)

Remembering Ernest Lee, FLS Fellow of the Linnean Society, who died in Flanders on active service on 11th July 1915.

Born in Stanley Cross End, Yorkshire on 11 April 1886, the son of a colliery expert, Ernest Lee was educated at the Burnley Technical Institute, before moving to the Royal College of Science where he studied and published on the ‘morphology of leaf fall’. He worked as a Demonstrator and Assistant Lecturer in Botany, Birkbeck College, London.

Elected a Fellow of the Linnean Society in June 1911, by 1913 he had moved to the Department of Agricultural Botany, University of Leeds. Here he joined the University of Leeds OTC Officer Training Corps in September 1914 (see links below).

Ernest Lee married a Fellow Linnean, Miss Helen Stuart Chambers FLS in November 1914, when he was already listed as ‘Officer in HM Forces’ on his wedding certificate. The daughter of a colliery manager, Helen was listed in 1911 as a lecturer at Royal Holloway College, London.

Ernest Lee was quickly gazetted a Second Lieutenant into the 4th Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding) Regiment. After training as a Machine Gun officer, he became a Lieutenant and survived three months at the Front before dying on 11 July 1915. He is buried at III D 12, Artillery Wood Cemetery, Ypres, Flanders.

His CWGC  headstone and a picture of Ernest Lee can be seen here at ww1. Cemeteries.com –  http://www.ww1cemeteries.com/ww1cemeteries/artillerywoodcemetery.htm

Ernest Lee is mentioned on the Western Front Association web pages in an article on the Leeds University OTC  http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/great-war-people/memorials/1646-the-university-of-leeds-otc-and-roll-of-honour.html which has recently added the following brief biography as part of an online article by David Stowe in 2010.

Lee, Ernest. Lt. 4th Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment) Date of Death: 11-7-1915. Cemetery-Memorial: Artillery Wood Cemetery. III. D. 12.

Lt. E. Lee was killed by a rifle bullet while supervising the repair of a parapet of his machine-gun emplacement on 10 July. Lee was lecturer in Agricultural Botany in the University for about eighteen months before the beginning of the War.

In that period he managed, by his great gift of energy and organising power to perform, in addition to his departmental duties, a great deal of unobtrusive but extremely valuable work for the University as a whole. Most important of all was his work for the O.T.C. He was only in the contingent about six months but in that period he must have established something like a record in attendance at parades. He revived enthusiasm in musketry to such an extent that many cadets paid not two but ten visits to the range during the summer of 1914.

Lee had persuaded several other members of the staff to join the contingent with him and when Captain Priestley left for France in August 1915, the work of the new conditions caused by the war fell on them. While waiting for his own commission Lee literally slaved at Headquarters. He was responsible for musketry instruction and did an enormous share of the spade work which produced the present system out of an almost hopeless chaos. With his regiment he was equally successful. He was promptly promoted lieutenant and given command of the machine gun section which he served till his death. He had an exceptionally unselfishly disposition; no exertion was too great and no task to trivial if the work was for the welfare and comfort of others.

A few months before he went to France he was married to Miss Helen Stuart Chambers, B.Sc., of 9 Grange Road Sheffield, and those of his friends who knew the great happiness that the union brought him will extend special sympathy to Mrs. Lee in her irreparable loss. He was an Associate of the Royal College of Science and a Fellow of the Linnean Society of London.

You can read more in our previous WW1  blogpost about other Lost Fellows of the Linnean Society at: https://worldwarzoogardener1939.wordpress.com/2013/09/11/lost-fellows-the-linnean-society-roll-of-honour-1914-1918/

Remembered …

Postscript

It appears likely that his widow Helen Stuart Lee remarried in 1920 to a John Woolfenden Williamson, barrister and carried on as a research assistant at the Botany Department Birkbeck College, joint author of a series of papers on fungi.  (Dictionary of British and Irish Botanists Ed Ray Desmond). She has an obituary in Nature, 1934, v 134, 998, having died on 4 December 1934.


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